Archive for Uganda

Organization of the Day: Gorilla Doctors

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2010 by Dori G

Today only 720 Mountain Gorillas populate the earth, and in only two parks (Uganda/Rwanda, and Democratic Republic of Congo). Dr. Dian Fossey founded what was originally called the Volcano Veterinarian Center in 1986. After studying Gorilla’s behavior and interaction with their environment she discovered that their population was declining rapidly, likely due to their interactions with humans. She decided to start a veterinarian project dedicated to the Gorillas. Sadly, she did not live to see the success, but today the project is known as Gorilla Doctors.

After years of research, scientists found that the secret to saving the lives of these animals existed within medical care. The largest threat facing these animals is disease, contracted through interaction with humans, other animals, and factors of their environment. Their research has found that people, mountain gorillas, and cattle share genetically identical intestinal pathogens, making them susceptible to diseases.

The Gorilla Doctors are a team of highly talented vets who intervene when needed and help nurse the Gorillas back to health. Seeing as the health of the Gorillas depends on the health of the people interacting with them, Gorilla Doctors also provide health care for their employees. Within the last ten years they have been able to increase the population of the Mountain Gorillas by 17%, and only hope to increase that number. These veterinarians are fully dedicated to their research, which has been groundbreaking, and to the survival of these precious gentle giants.

To learn more, please click here…..

Bookmark    and Share

Organization of The Day: Gorilla Doctors

Posted in Africa: Primates, Organization of The Day, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 23, 2010 by Dori G

Today only 720 Mountain Gorillas populate the earth, and in only two parks (Uganda/Rwanda, and Democratic Republic of Congo). Dr. Dian Fossey founded what was originally called the Volcano Veterinarian Center in 1986. After studying Gorilla’s behavior and interaction with their environment she discovered that their population was declining rapidly, likely due to their interactions with humans. She decided to start a Veterinarian project dedicated to the Gorillas. Sadly she did not live to see the success, but today the project is known as Gorilla Doctors.

After years of research, scientists found that the secret to saving the lives of these animals existed within medical care. The largest threat facing these animals is disease, contracted through interaction with humans, other animals, and factors of their environment. Their research has found that people, mountain gorillas, and cattle share genetically identical intestinal pathogens, making them susceptible to diseases.

The Gorilla Doctors are a team of highly talented vets who intervene when needed and help nurse the Gorillas back to health. Seeing as the health of the Gorillas depends on the health of the people interacting with them, Gorilla Doctors also provide health care for their employees. Within the last ten years they have been able to increase the population of the Mountain Gorillas by 17%, and only hope to increase that number. These veterinarians are fully dedicated to their research, which has been groundbreaking, and to the survival of these precious gentle giants.

To learn more, please click here…..

With the Help of Outside Money, Locals and Apes Have Finally Reached an Agreement

Posted in Africa: Primates with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 29, 2010 by kendickjerkins

In Uganda the conflict between apes and humans is one that causes one species to win at the cost of the other, and the loser is almost always the apes.  Recently, however, farmers in Kyamalera have learned to coexist with our closest relatives.  Apes, which used to be thought of as a commodity for bushmeat and the pet trade, are no longer just thought of as a source for poaching.  The tourism trade has bolstered the local economy by enabling locals to sell crafts and locally grown goods to the influx of outsiders with money.  The Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust has given these farmers start up money to begin making crafts to sell instead of poaching as a means of subsistence.  In Hoima where most of the forests are privately owned, organizations such as the Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust have been giving money to 84 different private owners of the forests to provide them with an alternative means of survival that does not require encroachment into the forest.

A dead chimpanzee lying on the forest floor.

An example of local crafts that can be found in Uganda.  With the influx of support, local farmers are able to sell goods such as these rather than poaching the great apes.

A bushmeat market where most poached animals are sold so that local citizens can survive.

To read the full article click here

Bookmark and Share

Poachers and Rangers Clash in Deadly Shooting in Uganda

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on March 10, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Rangers who were on a routine patrol in the Adjumani region of Uganda found themselves in a fire fight with poachers in the Zuka Game Reserve; residents had to flea as bullets were being exchanged between both groups.  One poacher was killed and two guns were seized, but the rest of the poachers were able to retreat to deep forest and get away, no arrests have been made yet.

Click here to read the full article about the fire fight.

Bookmark and Share

Update on Thailand’s Largest Ivory Bust….I was not Shocked… but I Grieved….Interview with Thailand’s Director of Clearance Customs Bureau

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 9, 2010 by kendickjerkins

“Was I shocked? No. But I grieved for the grisly fate of those elephants,” says Tanat Suvattanametakul.

Last week we made a posting about the largest Ivory seizure in Thailand to date. This is an update to that article interviewing Tanat Suvattanametakul, director of the Clearance Customs Bureau at Suvarnabhumi airport where the Ivory was found. Tanat, during the interview expresses his feelings about the seizure and first discovering it.  He goes in to depth explaining how poachers and crime syndicates are going to great lengths to get perfectly matched tusks, so that they are worth more on the market. The article also explains the value of the ivory that was seized and even how many elephants were killed for that particular shipment.  Furthermore, the interview explains how smugglers are beginning to take more complicated shipping routes in hopes of fooling authorities.

To Read the Full Article and Interview…Click Here

Bookmark and Share

Nebbi Chiefs & UWA Partner to Fight Poaching in Uganda

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2010 by kendickjerkins

The Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) has partnered with chiefdoms in Jonam county in Nebbi to fight poaching and bush meat trade in the district. Poaching, UWA said, was threatening wildlife in the Murchison Falls National Park.
The traditional chiefs have vowed to curse the poachers.  During the launch of the campaign against the vice in Pakwach town council last week, poachers handed over 15 spears, seven traps and 20 wire snares that they were using to kill wild animals.

Hophly Ongiertho, the Pakwach town council mayor, hailed the partnership between UWA and Jonam chiefdoms in fight bush meat trade, saying poaching and fishing were affecting the quality of education in Jonam. “Most children would rather go poaching or fishing than go to school,” he explained.

Full Article…Here

The Lusaka Task Force: Fighting Poaching & Wildlife Crimes

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2010 by kendickjerkins

The Lusaka Agreement on Co-operative Enforcement Operations Directed at Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora was the brain-child of Wildlife Law Enforcement Officers from eight Eastern and Southern African countries meeting in Lusaka, Zambia in December 1992, under the auspices of Zambia’s Ministry of Tourism. This was followed up with working group meetings involving CITES, Interpol and US Fish & Wildlife Service special agents, as well as London University lawyers of the Foundation for International Environment Law Development (FIELD). The development of this African initiative a year later led to formal inter-governmental negotiations under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). This led to the adoption of the Lusaka Agreement on Co-operative Enforcement Operations Directed at Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora on 8th September 1994, with UN Secretary General, New York  the Depositary.
The Agreement came into force on 10th December 1996 with the ratification, or formal acceptance, by four signatories. Currently, there are six Parties to the Agreement: The Republics of Congo (Brazzaville), Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and the Kingdom of Lesotho. Republics of South Africa, Ethiopia and the Kingdom of Swaziland are signatories.
The Agreement provides for setting up of a permanent Task Force that would implement its objectives. Consequently, the Lusaka Agreement Task Force (Task Force) was launched on 1st  June 1999, with its headquarters located in Nairobi, Kenya.

The Lusaka Agreement Task Force (LATF) working jointly with the Tanzania Wildlife Division (TWD) and Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB) Dar es Salaam on 17th December, 2009 managed to arrest the main suspect in connection with illegal export of 769 pieces of elephant tusks, weighing 2005.6 Kg seized at the port of Hai Phong, Vietnam in August 2009. The contraband was disguised as sea shells and believed to have originated from Zanzibar. This arrest followed intensive investigation coordinated by LATF that started in September 2009. The arrested suspect Ramadhani Pandu Makame (alias Babu Rama) was indicated the exporter on the contraband’s accompanying documents. The investigation (ongoing) has also enabled collection of intelligence on the modus operandi, trade routes and possible destinations of elephant tusks in the Far East from the Region.

To learn more about the Lusaka Task Force you can visit their page on Wildlifedirect or their homepage.