Archive for tattoos

Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 14, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Jason Goldberg.

 

The Red Panda is a small, arboreal, omnivorous mammal that is listed as ‘vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.  It is found in China, Nepal, Bhutan, Myanmar, and India.  Sadly, red panda populations are undergoing a significant decline and it’s estimated there are now fewer than 10,000 mature individuals remaining in the wild.

To save the red panda, we must first protect its habitat, as habitat loss is the number one threat to their existence. Logging and other types of deforestation have reduced a great deal of the forests this animal relies on.  These activities have also upset the delicate balance that exists between the forest’s dense root systems and the soil.  In Nepal, the lack of the dense root systems has caused the rich soil to cascade down mountainsides during monsoons, burying communities, destroying habitat, and leaving human and animal death in its wake.

In Bhutan, this critter is hunted for its fur, which is used to make hats.  In China, Red Panda pelts can be found in many local markets and poaching pressures have furthered population decines, and has even led to extinction in some areas.  Red Pandas are protected in all of the countries where they are found, with the exception of Myanmar.  In China, the species fortunately receives increased protection where it occurs within Giant Panda reserves.

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

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Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 13, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Oleg Turyanskiy.

 

A few interesting facts about lions:

  • Every lion has ‘whisker spots’.  The whisker spots for the top row of whiskers differ between individuals and remains constant throughout their life.  Researchers often use this unique pattern to identify individuals in a pride.
  • Lions have 30 teeth!
  • Male lions are 20-35% larger than females and 50% heavier.  Some believe their mane makes them look bigger and protects him from bites and scratches when fighting with male for control of a pride.  Researchers have also found that the size and coloration of the mane may serve as a sign of the male’s fitness to potential female mates.  It seems the ladies prefer fuller and darker manes!  Males’ large body size also means they eat more food.  Male lions can eat up to 43 kilograms (94.6 pounds) in a day, while a female may eat over 25 kg (55 pounds).
  • Most lions drink water daily if it is available, but can go up to five days without.  Those that live in arid areas appear to obtain the moisture they need from the stomach contents of their prey.
  • Water sources also offer a place to ambush prey because the pride is able to funnel potential victims into a smaller area.  These locations are favored by prides, and they will maintain presence over them for generations if possible.
  • Lions are classified as ‘vulnerable‘ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™.  Their numbers have been declining rapidly over the last few decades due to habitat loss, humans’ indiscriminate killing of lions, persecution from humans, and disease.  Trophy hunting is also beginning to emerge as a considerable threat to their existence, particularly through altering sex and age ratios and shifting pride dynamics.  Conservationists have warned that we could lose lions, an internationally recognized African icon, in as little as 20 years.

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

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Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 9, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Hayley Lakeman.

 

Sea otters are social animals that can sometimes be found floating in groups (called rafts) of more than 100 individuals.  They spend the majority of their time in the water, even giving birth in the frigid sea.  Their coat is invaluable- keeping  the animal’s skin dry.  Unlike other marine mammals that have a thick layer of blubber to keep warm, sea otters have a thick underfur that traps air to form an insulating, waterproof barrier against the cold water.  This fur can consist of up to one million hairs per square inch!  If a sea otter’s coat is soiled or contaminated with foreign substances, like oil, it will lose its insulating properties and the otters can die from hypothermia as a result.

Due to the fur trade in the early 1900’s, the number of otters plummeted from over one million to a mere 2,000.  Intense conservation efforts in California, Alaska, and Canada has helped to stabilize their numbers.  Although the sea otter population is considered stable, subpopulations in some areas are continuing to decline for unknown reasons.  Sea otters are currently listed as ‘endangered’ on the IUCN Red List, and continue to be threatened by oil spills, chemical and biological pollutants, habitat loss and degradation, reduced food sources, disease, fishing gear entrapment, and conflict with shellfish fisheries.

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

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Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 8, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Boris.

 

The largest great hammerhead on record was caught by fishermen in 2006 off the coast of Sarasota, Florida.  The female shark was 14 feet long, weighed nearly 581 kilograms (1,280 pounds), and had a “hammer” that was more than three feet wide.  In her stomach, they found an entire southern stingray and the rear half of a five foot (one and half meter) tarpon.  She also had 52 near-term pups in her uterus. Her body was donated to Mote Marine Laboratory.  Dr. Hueter, director if Mote Marine Laboratory’s Center for Shark Research had this to say about the shark:

“Although we are thankful that the fisherman gave this unique specimen to Mote, and we are learning a lot about this species from this large female shark, we were saddened to see so many unborn pups inside her so close to birth. We ask fishermen not to kill sharks for sport and to remember that shark populations have been severely depleted by overfishing. Very large sharks like this hammerhead are often pregnant females that help maintain the status of the species’ population into the future. We advocate release of these large sharks and the tagging of them whenever possible.”

Great hammerheads are listed as ‘endangered’ by the IUCN.  According to the IUCN, “The Great Hammerhead is highly prized for its fins, and suffers very high levels of incidental mortality in other fisheries for tuna and tuna-like fishes. Like most other sharks, its slow growth and low reproduction rate makes it highly vulnerable to overexploitation. As a result, it has suffered serious declines, especially in parts of the eastern Atlantic where fishing effort is unmanaged and unmonitored.”

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

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Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Don (owner) at Art in Motion.

 

Golden snub-nosed monkeys are Old World primates that inhabit temperate mountain forests in parts of Asia.  Primarily an arboreal (tree-dwelling) species, snub-nosed monkeys live in groups of over 600 members.  They defend their territory with shouts and have a large vocal repertoire and have been seen calling alone and in groups in a choir-like fashion.  During the winter when food is scarce they break off into smaller groups.  Their diet consists of tree needles, bamboo buds, fruits and leaves. They have a multi-chambered stomach that helps them digest the roughage.

Little is known about these monkeys, which are considered ‘endangered‘ by the IUCN.  It is estimated that there are between 8,000-20,000 left, but populations are declining at such a rapid rate that it has been difficult to obtain accurate numbers.  They can be found in a number of protected areas including the Baihe, Foping, Shennongjia, and Wangland Nature Reserves.

The snub-nosed monkey is protected from trade by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).  Unfortunately, poaching continues to occur as body parts, thought to prevent rheumatism, continue to be used in traditional Chinese medicines.  This, in combination with ongoing habitat loss and use of the animal as bushmeat, has placed these primates in a dire situation.  A new species of snub-nosed monkey, which is so snub-nosed that even rainfall sends it into a sneezing frenzy, was recently discovered in Myanmar.  Scientists were alerted to the monkey by hunters, and the first and only observed individual of this new species was killed by local hunters and eaten shortly after researchers examined it.

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

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Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 29, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Phil Garcia.

 

Peacocks are colorful members of the pheasant family. While the term “peacock” is frequently used to refer to both sexes, technically only males are peacocks. Females are peahens, hatchlings are peachicks, and together, they are called peafowl. The blue and green iridescent tails of the male are stunning and beautiful. Their tail feathers, also called coverts, create a train that is more than 60% of the animal’s total body length and can number over 200 colorful “eye” markings in blue, gold, red, and other hues. With the length of its train and wingspan considered, peacocks are one of the largest flying birds.

Peafowl are omnivorous, feeding on insects, plants, and small reptiles. There are three species of peafowl, all of which are thought to have originated in Asia. Indian Peafowl (also known as Blue Peafowl and Common Peafowl) live in India and Sri Lanka. Green Peafowl are found in the tropical forests of southeast Asia. The third is a little-known and distinct species, the Congo Peacock  (‘vulnerable’), which inhabits the eastern stretches of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s rainforests.

The Green Peafowl is classified as ‘endangered‘ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.  Its status has been uplisted from ‘vulnerable’, which it was prior to 2009.  Widespread hunting for meat and feathers, nest poaching, conflict with humans (who view them as crop pests), and a reduction in extent and quality of habitat have been the main factors fueling their decline.  Environmental contamination from the use of pesticides and insecticides has also contributed to the demise of this species.

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

Bookmark    and Share

 

Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 26, 2010 by Caroline Thompson

 

Tattoo by Matt DUFFenbach.

 

The Giant Panda is found only in southwestern China, in six small forest fragments at altitudes above 4,000 feet.  Their limited range is attributed to their dependance on their main food source, bamboo.  Their coloration has fascinated us for years, but scientists only have theories to why they have such contrasting black and white colors.  One idea is that the coloration helps them stand out in the forest to aid in finding mates. Another is that the contrasting color may be camouflage in the treetops and bamboo.  Each panda’s markings are unique and varies from black and white to a rare brown and white variation. Panda’s were subject to poaching for their fur in the past, but harsher punishments for poachers has greatly reduced the incidence. Currently, habitat loss and shortages of bamboo are the primary threats Giant Pandas face.

 

Remember: Tattoos are forever… and so is extinction.  To see all of the FANTASTIC art featured on Bush Warriors Tattoo of the Day, and to learn more about this initiative, please click here.  You can also share photos of your own wildlife tattoos and enjoy others’ at our Facebook group, Bush Warriors Inked Nation for Conservation.

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