Archive for Tanzania

Are elephants an ‘African natural resource’ or of deeper value?

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Following the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species on Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) held in Qatar, Botswana has threatened to pull out of the convention, and remove elephants from the list of species under protection. As expected, the elephants issue dominated this year’s CITES debate and further divided African countries. It has also emerged that Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries are unhappy with CITES. The convention banned the ivory trade. Pulling out, which is defined as reservation by species, has been mooted as a possibility, which will allow the countries to sell their ivory stockpiles.

SADC states, including Botswana, South Africa, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe, will meet throughout April, in Malawi to work out a strategy. The possibility to go into reservation follows on the proposal backed by 23 other elephant range nations that would have extended the trade moratorium on ivory trade to 20 years, from the current nine years.

Botswana has about 18 tonnes of legal ivory in its stocks and spends over P700 000 annually to secure the stock. At the last sale the country earned over US$7 million. The decision by CITES to reject Zambia’s proposal has been described as “a ban on the use of African natural resources”. According to the IMWC World Conservation Trust, these decisions mean that “significant ivory stocks will now be left in storage instead of generating revenue for use in elephant conservation. Africans are effectively being barred from utilizing their own natural resources.”

As the war on poaching rages on and the subject of ivory remains highly controversial many questions are raised regarding the fate of elephants. Are they, as some say a natural resource…better yet a national resource or do elephants hold a higher, irreplaceable and invaluable spot in this world?

(Credit: Chas Rob)

(Credit: Miha Krofel)

To read the full article, click here

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Will China kill all Africa’s elephants?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 30, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Dead elephants=ivory to sell on the black market.  200 kilos of ivory=$200,000.  200 kilos of ivory=a lot of dead elephants.  Last week when CITES refused to lift the moratorium on ivory sales by African countries the immediate effect was an increase in the amount of ivory on the black market; and the Chinese appetite for ivory is voracious.  This has led to an increase in all things illegal in Africa from the timber trade to gun running, and as long as there is a market for it, elephant tusks will continue to be a best seller.  The up-and-coming Chinese middle class has is insatiable in their desire for ivory trinkets such as chopsticks, and African countries are more than happy to oblige them.

A seized shipment of elephant tusks.

To read the full article, click here

It’s Official, Tanzania and Zambia’ Request to Sell Ivory Have Been Turned Down

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 22, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Today, the UN’s wildlife trade organizations have turned down Tanzania’s and Zambia’s requests to sell ivory. This is a great victory for conservationist and wildlife fans alike and a monumental step towards ending poaching. For the past month  we have been updating viewers about all that has been going on leading up to CITES CoP15, which has been going on for the past week. Through the awareness created, the numerous petitions that we’ve rallied and  our supporters who signed and spread the petition, a movement was created.

It is without a doubt that the public outcry that was created and the nearly 500,000 petition signatures shifted the decision made by the standing committee. However,  it doesn’t just end there,  stopping the legal sale of ivory stockpiles is one thing, but the illegal ivory trade still continues to flourish. We must continue to raise awareness about this issue and educate others. Laws and documents aren’t going to end poaching and stop the demand for ivory, educating the end user is what’s needed.

Below is a video created by the Environmental Investigation Agency into the illegal ivory trade in Tanzania and Zambia, the 2 countries who’s proposal to legalize ivory sale was just rejected.

To read the BBC article on the official news…click here

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Poaching War Escalates As Suspected Tanzanian Nationals Shot Dead In Kenya’s Tsavo National Park

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 16, 2010 by kendickjerkins

The district police boss Herbert Khaemba, confirmed the Saturday night incident and said the poachers, suspected to be Tanzanian nationals, were shot dead at Kuranze area, Kasigahu location in Tsavo West National Park. The killings comes barely a week after KWS personnel arrested another poacher and recovered two rifles and three rounds of ammunition at Galana Ranch in the Southern part of Tsavo East National Park in the on-going onslaught on poaching activities in the area.

Khaemba said the rangers on patrol challenged the poachers to surrender but they started shooting at them (rangers) who, in turn, shot back killing three of the poachers.  The warden said by the time the poachers were killed, they had already felled three jumbos. “We had earlier discovered three elephant carcasses without ivory and we highly suspect the gang was behind the killing,” he added.

KWS Director Mr. Julius Kipngetich holding seized Ivory

Skin and Bones remain from poached Elephant in Tsavo

To Read the Full Article…Click Here

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8% of the world’s elephant population is being killed each year by poachers

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 12, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Sam Wasser, a conservation biologist at the University of Washington, is calling for a moratorium on the sale of elephant tusks.  Through DNA analysis he has concluded that 8% of the world’s elephant population is being killed each year by poachers.  Wasser has also concluded that most of the black market ivory being seized is coming from Zambia and Tanzania; two countries who are petitioning to have the ban of selling elephant ivory lifted at this years CITES conference.

An elephant being skinned and for meat and tusks by poachers after it was killed.

The head of an African elephant.

Conservation biologists Samuel Wasser (left) and Benezeth Mutayoba remove a piece of elephant tusk for DNA extraction.

A graph comparing Mikumi and Amboseli elephant group sizes.  Mikumi is subject to poaching, Amboseli is not.

To read the full article about Wasser’s findings, click here

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Support Petitions to Ban Ivory

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 8, 2010 by kendickjerkins

It has been nearly a month since we first posted a petition in support of the ban on ivory. Now with CITES CoP15 drawing closer by the day the decision on whether or not ivory stockpiles will be sold comes even closer.  In the words of  Dr. Julius Kipngetich, from a speech last year,”everytime there is a CITES decision on Trade in Elephant Ivory, you always see a spike in poaching activities. The recent escalation is a direct result of CITES 2007 decision allowing 4 southern African states to trade in Ivory”

It is now imperative that people around the world voice their support for the ban on ivory because this meeting can and will decide the fate of elephants and other species in the future.

Help wildlife in Africa by taking a few minutes and signing the following petitions.

The first petition, found here is the initial petition we were promoting. It is sponsored by the Care2 petition site and is aimed at CITES Secretary-General Willem Wijnstekers. The second petition, found here, supported by the David Sheldrick  Wildlife Trust is a request urging members of the 15th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties of CITES to vote NO on the decision to sell ivory stockpiles.

No words needed……


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Ivory Conflict Escalates as Africa and EU go head to head: Your Tuna for Our Elephants

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 8, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Support protection of our elephants and we’ll help you protect your bluefin tuna, 23 African countries told the European Union on Friday. By contrast, if the EU does not back their case, they threatened to oppose Europe’s proposal to ban trade in the giant fish. The group of African countries, which includes Kenya, Ethiopia and Nigeria, are concerned that most EU countries support Tanzania and Zambia’s attempts to restart the ivory trade.

EU ambassadors met on Friday to finalise the bloc’s position at the next CITES meeting which starts on March 13. The diplomats are expected to confirm support for an endangered listing for the Atlantic bluefin, which would effectively ban trade in the endangered fish which can fetch up to $100,000 each at market. “Please do not force our collective hand to cast our 23 votes against the EU on any of the issues it is supporting such as, for example, the high profile proposed ban on bluefin tuna.”

Bluefin Tuna Populations are in decline

Similarly, so are Elephant populations in Africa

To Read the Full Article…Click Here

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