Archive for Leopard

Indian Poachers Shift Spotlight From Tigers To Leopards

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2010 by kendickjerkins

With the dwindling tiger population, poachers are increasingly on the prowl for the country’s other big cat. And if figures are anything to go by, the leopard will soon beat the tiger in the extinction race. More than 70 leopards were killed across the country in the first three months of this year. And as many as 290 leopards were killed last year, nearly twice as many as the 157 in 2008 according to records available with the Wildlife Protection Society of India.

But wildlifers said the figure could be higher. Some say that up to 500 leopards are killed yearly in India, which has an estimated population of around 8,000 leopards. “Poachers have shifted focus to leopards because they are near-perfect substitutes for tigers’s body parts,” said wildlife activist Jaswant Singh Kalair. Wildlife activists have demanded a dedicated conservation program — on the lines of Project Tiger — for leopards. But so far, forest authorities have not taken any initiative. “Like Project Tiger, a dedicated conservation program for leopards is a must. Poaching of leopards needs to be checked to ensure they don’t face extinction,” said another activist.

A leopard skin sells for Rs 25,000 in the local black market. In big cities, the price goes up to Rs 50,000 and in the international market, it can fetch Rs 100,000.

To read the full article, click here

Organization of The Day: The Mara Conservancy

Posted in Africa: Elephants, Africa: Lions, Africa: Primates, Africa: Rhinos, Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Mara Conservancy


Management of the Mara Triangle was falling apart, until 2001, when Mara Conservancy stepped in and took control over the triangle. Their programs include anti-poaching and de-snaring patrols, as well as a mobile veterinary unit that is always on the move. These units help animals that have been snared by cutting wires and treating open wounds, giving the animals a chance to survive.

The help of the conservancy extends to surrounding communities creating a ripple effect that in turn helps protect wildlife. They have started a project that brings bio-gas to surrounding homes. Bio gas reduces smoke within homes, preventing women from having to search for wood. Because of this, the depletion of surrounding forests is reduced as well as human-wildlife conflict, an obstacle that faces many conservationists.

Additionally, they’ve brought toilets to 5 villages and plan to construct more. Female genital mutilation is a huge problem in surrounding communities and Mara has educated them in hopes to stop the mutilation. They’ve also reduced revenge killing of predators by giving livestock guardians and replacing the livestock when possible. With the reduction of revenge killing, better patrol of the area, veterinarians in place and their efforts in reaching out to the community Mara Conservancy has taken huge strides in the protection of wildlife.

To Learn More about the Conservancy & the Mara Triangle, click here.

Introducing Safari.TV

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 23, 2010 by kendickjerkins

It is with GREAT pleasure that we would like to introduce our new partner Safari.TV and a new section of our blog titled ‘Safari TV.’

As you well know by now nothing makes us more happy than seeing wildlife in  its greatness. It’s even better when you’re right there with it. But when you can’t and the only thing you have in front of you is a computer, guess what……. you now can……

It is our pleasure to introduce to you our latest partnership with WildEarth TV and their outstanding Safari TV. WildEarth is the brain child of Graham Wallington. For those of you who don’t know, Graham is a wildlife film maker and is one of the founders of the ground breaking and legendary Africam.

The Safari Channel  is headed by William Fox and broadcasts LIVE safaris daily from Djuma Game Reserve in the Sabi Sands. Every day there are two safaris one from 06h00 CAT to 09h00CAT and the other from 15h00CAT to 18h00 CAT. (these times change during the different seasons). Our Safari TV page will give you a professionally edited daily highlights from these safaris, which you are going to love…….

The safari consists of a Presenter/Expert Ranger who drives around the reserve looking for animals both big and small. A camera person sits on the back of the safari vehicle and their camera is your eyes. This gives you the viewer a fantastic feeling of actually being on the back of the vehicle as it bumps through the African Bush. If you want to talk to the Ranger in real time you can email a question through to finalcontrol@safari.tv and he will try to answer it.

The Sabi Sands is one of the top locations in South Africa for viewing game. The Sabi Sands Park which together with some other parks make up the Greater Kruger National Park. It is a conservation area where the Big Five (lion, leopard, rhinoceros, buffalo, elephant) occur naturally. There are safaris in open land rovers during the day and at night, and there are also guided bush walks. Sabi Sabi has four separate lodges, Earth Lodge, Bush Lodge, Selati Lodge and Little Bush Camp. There is a licensed airstrip at Sabi Sabi with scheduled flights from Johannesburg. The area is also accessible by car and roads from Johannesburg. People travel from all over the world to visit this place and now you can join them from the comfort of  your own home or office.

The Safari Channel also hosts a number of other live show such as fire side chats with the crew, remarkable  creatures and photography shows. To learn more, please visit their website. To see highlights and blog updates, click here

Stopping wildlife trafficking in Congo

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 2, 2010 by kendickjerkins

The bushmeat trade in the Congo basin has been widely publicized but poorly addressed. While fines and sentences exist for wildlife trafficking, they have traditionally been poorly enforced due to corruption, poor governance, and attentions focused on other priorities. Major traffickers, who tend to be rich and well-connected, trade with impunity, knowing that a well-placed bribe or a phone call can get them off with little more than a slap on a wrist.

A leopard skin and gorilla hands confiscated from poachers

More confiscated items including carved and uncarved ivory, hides, and other animal products

To read the full article click here

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Africa’s cheetahs, leopards face extinction as poaching intensifies

Posted in Africa: Lions with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 29, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Most rare and precious African fauna and flora species are on the verge of extinction, today more than in the past years following increased illegal trade in the past decade as global demand for these increases on daily basis.

Game poaching has been singled out as the greatest threat that could lead to the extinction of wild animals like elephants, leopards, rhinoceros, gorillas and buffaloes among other African animals, making these species more endangered like never before.

An African leopard

And a cheetah

I hope this cheetah looks as good on someone’s wall as she does prowling the African savanna in search of an impala to feed her kittens so that they too may maintain the beauty and biodiversity of the world in which we live.

Click here to read the full article

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90% drop in Africa’s lion population in 20 years!!!!

Posted in Africa: Lions with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 25, 2010 by kendickjerkins

For many years there has been a general attitude prevailing (even amongst wildlife authorities) that lions and leopards particularly, as well as other predators, have been able to look after themselves and that some how they would always be around and that wild Africa would allow them to roam freely as they always have.  Somehow the lion and leopard have been largely ignored in all of this and the wild African lion population, which was estimated at between 150,000-200,000 in the 1980’s, has plummeted in the last two decades to between 18,000 and 25,000 today. It is thought that Kenya holds about 10% of that figure. And yet, unlike elephants (a far more numerous species), lions have no protection under the international accord governing such matters.

Credit:  James Weis

Much spotlight and huge international reaction was drawn to the dreadful elephant and rhino poaching of the 1970’s and 1980’s which resulted in a dramatic turn around. In addressing the appalling losses through poaching of these two species Richard Leakey spearheaded a massive campaign to combat the poaching and also harnessing the huge attention and funding that his efforts and those of many others generated. This all resulted in dramatically reducing the poaching in Kenya, international bans on ivory and rhino horn and species protection policies that are still much in place today where these species exist. Why can’t this be done today for the predators? Do these incredibly valuable and beautiful species have to be reduced in numbers to where they only exist in National Parks and sanctuaries? Or can they still roam wild and free in large areas like the wildland habitat surrounding Masai Mara? Importantly the Masai Mara region holds more than one third of the entire lion population of Kenya. This makes it all the more valuable to protect.

Credit: James Weis

We don’t have much time. The biggest threat isn’t hunters, poachers or poison makers — it is our own complacency, the lazy hope that someone else is taking care of the great beasts of Africa. Lions and other large predators are disappearing even as we learn more about the collapse of entire ecosystems. The $200 billion a year reaped from ecotourism will be lost, causing suffering among communities all over Africa that rely on this trade.

Credit: James Weis

To Read this Article…Click Here

African officials seize over 3,000 pounds of ivory, dozens arrested

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2009 by kendickjerkins

African authorities raided shops, intercepted vehicles at checkpoints and used sniffer dogs to detect and seize over 3,800 pounds (1,768 kilograms) of illegal elephant ivory in a six-nation operation, Interpol and the Kenya Wildlife Service said Monday. The Kenya Wildlife Service says it has arrested 65 people during the operation.

Article Here