Archive for Ivory

Family of 10 slaughtered on the Zimbabwe Mozambique border…

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Poachers shot and killed 10 elephants at one spot in Gonarezhou National Park in Chikombedzi along Zimbabwe’s border with Mozambique and South Africa last week. The elephant carcasses without tusks were found lying along Mutandanjiva River near the road to Ndali communal lands in the north-eastern part of Gonarezhou.

Family of elephants left for dead

Parks and Wildlife Management Authority immediately put a US$1,000 reward for anyone with information leading to the arrest of the poachers. “The carcasses were discovered on June 1 and several spent cartridges from an FN riffle were found on the scene. The tusks were removed in what appeared to be a well-organized professional job.”

Ranger holding bloody ivory

Parks spokesperson Ms Caroline Washaya-Moyo said the newly appointed Parks Director General, Mr Vitalis Chadenga visited Gonarezhou at the weekend to get first hand information and he was satisfied by the level of investigations taking place, with assistance from national security agents.

To read the full article, click here

Organization of The Day: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

Posted in Africa: Elephants, Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 9, 2010 by kendickjerkins

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

David Sheldrick is a legendary figure in wildlife conservation, he founded what today is the largest national park in Kenya, Tsavo. He was the first warden of the Eastern Sector which stretched over 5,000 square miles. His dedication to helping wildlife lasted until the end of his life. He was a remarkable man with many achievements, he was the first person to ever hand-rear orphaned elephants. He was a man of great integrity and therefore, a trust has been formed in his name to have his legacy live on.

The trust supports the Tsavo National Park and cares for orphaned animals that have lost their parents to devastating events such as poaching. The trust raises them, keeps them from harm and re-introduces them into the wild where they belong. The Sheldrick Wildlife’s support stretches far and wide, they have spoken out about the ivory ban, put in place anti-poaching and de-snaring operations, as well as mobile veterinary projects. Their help gives hope to the war on wildlife.

To learn how you can help or donate, click here

Acrobatic Pilot Saves Wild Animals in Kenya

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2010 by kendickjerkins

An american acrobatic pilot renowned for her skills at air shows is teaching advanced flying skills to Kenyan pilots to help them spot wildlife poachers. Patty Wagstaff has won three acrobatic flying championships. She also trains pilots and has been lending her time and expertise to wild elephant conservation. Wildlife poachers have said the top deterrent to poaching wild animals is air patrols. Flying so low and at slower speeds to spot poachers is dangerous for pilots in Kenya who sometimes have only basic flying skills.

Wagstaff teaches them in week-long clinics, partly funded by the Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh Foundation. From her they learn techniques that reduce mistakes which too often lead to crashes. They love to fly and care about wildlife, so they are happy to take to the sky and spot poachers. Wild elephants have been poached in Kenya for their ivory going back a long time. She has been working with the pilots for six years to reduce and stop it. The pilots there are associated with the Kenya Wildlife Service.

To read the full article, click here

Organization of The Day: Save The Elephants

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2010 by kendickjerkins

SAVE THE ELEPHANTS

After witnessing the complete devastation of African elephants in the 70’s an 80’s, a period which saw the demise of half of Africa’s elephant population due to poaching, Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton alerted the world of an “ivory poaching holocaust”. His revolutionary research into the status and behavior of the African elephant gave him the insight needed to establish an organization that would fight for the future of these animals. Founded in 1993, Save the Elephants (STE) is a non-governmental organization focused on saving the vastly-impacted African elephant population and its environment, while also striving to bridge a dynamic relationship between humans and elephants. Their strategy is centered on four pillars critical to guarding the future of the elephants: research, protection, grassroots efforts, and education. STE’s innovative research on elephant behavior and ecology allows them to develop conservation efforts that are cognizant of the elephants’ point of view.

The organization teams with local wildlife departments to fight poaching by using aerial surveillance and radio tracking to protect these amazing animals. STE strengthens their efforts by working directly with the local people living amongst the elephants and encouraging them to participate and engage in the organization’s research and education initiatives.

The organization serves as a prime example of the power behind developing a conservation ethic that incorporates local knowledge and helps to create a two-way ambassadorship between the local people and the elephants. STE also uses education to increase global awareness about the state of the African elephant and the intricate and intelligent design of these animals. Most recently, Save the Elephants has been a major player in the opposition against banning the illegal ivory trade, believed to be the greatest potential threat to elephants, at the 15th Conference of the Parties (COP15) of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)

To Learn More about Save The Elephants Click Here…



Tsavo National Park: Past, Present, and Future

Posted in Africa: Elephants, Africa: Rhinos, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Tsavo National Park is Kenya’s largest national park with 20,812 square kilometers and is home to incredible biodiversity.  However, the early years of the park were marred by unchecked poaching of many of the native species including rhinos and elephants.  In 25 years of poaching over 90% of the countries rhinos and elephants were illegally killed for their horns and tusks.  However, in the mid 1990s CITES finally recognized what had been going on and listed rhinos and elephants as as Appendix I animals and a moratorium on all elephant and rhino products was enacted.

A local Kenyan who lives on the border of Tsavo National Park

In 1989 in a show of good faith Kenya burned 12 tons of ivory worth $1 million dollars.  Tsavo National Park is now facing new types of pressures; when the park was first founded the population of Kenya was approximately 1 million people, it is now over 40 million people.  This means that the edge of the park and human settlement is now a very obvious line of settlement on one side of the line and wild park line on the other side.  Climate change, trade in arms between war torn states and the bush meat trade  are now all major concerns for the Kenyan government and Tsavo National Park.  Another problem is that as soon as animals cross the border into Tanzania they lose much of their protection as the Tanzanian government is not nearly as strict in their anti-poaching enforcement.

Elephants in Tsavo National Park

Black rhinos that had a population of 6000 in the 1970s is now down to about 50 individuals.  The same story is true for elephants: 36,000 in the 1970s and only 6000 now.  The future of Tsavo National Park is going to depend on some creative thinking of conservationists and government officials.  It is obvious that the park and animals that call it home can not survive if a way is not found to have the park benefit the locals who live around its borders.  With the price of ivory so high in China and other eastern countries the lure of poaching is just too strong.

Kenyan and Tanzanian anti-poaching units with suspected poachers

To read the full article click here

Bookmark and Share

One of World’s Last Javan Rhinos Murdered by Poachers in Vietnam

Posted in Asia: Rhinos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2010 by kendickjerkins

A Javan rhino, one of the world’s rarest large mammals, has been found shot dead with its horn chopped off in a national park in southern Vietnam, a suspected victim of poachers.

A team of rangers found the rhino’s carcass April 29 inside Cat Tien National Park in Dong Nai province, said park official Bach Thanh Hai. It had already fully decayed, and authorities believe it could have died more than three months ago, he said.

Hai said the animal had been shot one time through the front leg and its horn — considered a valuable ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine — had been removed.

Authorities suspect that there are only three to five Javan rhinos left in Vietnam!

To read the full article, click here

Rhino Horn Smuggler Arrested Near Nepal-India Border

Posted in Asia: Rhinos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 2, 2010 by kendickjerkins

A 27-year-old man was arrested in Dhangadi as he tried to smuggle a rhino horn out of Nepal. The arrest of Gagan Lama of Kada-7, Bajhang, occurred at the Dhangadi Bus Park as Lama attempted to sneak out of the country with the rhino horn.

District Forest Officer Ramesh Chand and Geta Area Forest Office Chief Ambika Prasad Proudel led the team that arrested Lama.

Lama is currently being held at the District Forest Office, and forest officials are hopeful that the arrest will lead to more information about rhino horn trading networks operating in the area.

  • Map and article courtesy Saving Rhinos
  • Photo Credit: Mark Davis

To read the full article, click here

**GRAPHIC Video**- Carcass of a freshly slaughtered elephant …No words needed

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2010 by Dori G

No words are needed…….


Asia’s police forces cracking down on Ivory, despite booming demand in Asia

Posted in Africa: Elephants, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2010 by kendickjerkins

As the demand for ivory continues to rise in Asia, more and more African elephants are feeling the repercussions.  A single large elephant tusk can now go for as much as $17,000 on the black market and with that kind of money involved there is no shortage of people willing to sell them illicitly.  Sierra Leone & Burundi no longer have any elephants inside their borders, and Senegal now has less than ten.  Samuel K. Wasser, director of the Center for Conservation Biology at the University of Washington has estimated the value of the illegal ivory trade at $264 million dollars over the past decade and warns that: “If we don’t get the illegal trade under control soon, elephants could be wiped out over much of Africa.”

Two tons of ivory seized in Bangkok that was being transported from Africa.

The primary destinations for illegal ivory have traditionally been Thailand, Japan and China, which have thriving black markets and some of the world’s best ivory carvers. However police forces throughout these nations have begun cracking down on the lucrative trade. Thailand had three seizures last year and already had its biggest yet in February, when 2 tons of African tusks worth $3.6 million were found in containers bound for Laos. In the Chinese city of Putian, where ivory demand is high a dealer by the name of Chen shows how difficult it is to control the ivory trade. Chinese police started cracking down on ivory theft in February. Since the raids, Chen said he has stopped selling the “xiang ya,” the Chinese word for ivory, which translates to “elephant tooth.” But not for long. “I don’t dare sell anything now because they’re cracking down,” he said, over the din of electric saws being used to carve wooden dragon statues. “Come back in early June and I should be able to sell.”

While governments insist their cracking down on the trade, officials admit corruption is rife within their ranks, which remains a huge challenge in the war on ivory. Lt. Col. Adtapon Sudsai, who investigates the illegal trade in Thailand, said it is not unusual to find ivory carvings in Buddhist temples or the homes of politicians or high-ranking police and military officers as a sign of power.

A pile of illegally obtained elephant tusks.

To read the full article click here

Bookmark and Share

Legendary Tusker Tracked in Kruger National Park

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 12, 2010 by kendickjerkins

One of the oldest tuskers in Kruger National Park (KNP), Duke, has been fitted with a tracking collar in an effort to track his whereabouts should he die.

Reynold Thakhuli, of South African National Parks (SANParks), said Duke was approaching his final few days in the bush and he might die any day and that SANParks, would like to keep his skull in the Elephant Hall Museum of the Letaba Camp of KNP for future generations and research purposes.

Thakhuli said it was estimated that Duke had lived in the KNP bush for more than 55 years. “As a sign of aging he has already lost both his tusks while walking the vast area in KNP and he is also on his last set of teeth which makes it difficult for digestion. Fortunately the tusks were found and will be placed at the museum.”

(Credit: Petits Voyages)

To read the full article, click here