Archive for Ivory

International Crime Syndicates Involved in Murder and Mutilation of Wildlife in East and Central Africa

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Africa’s largest-ever investigation of wildlife crime has unearthed a ton of illegal African elephant ivory, several animal pelts, and hippopotamus teeth, the Kenya Wildlife Service and INTERPOL announced this week. The undercover operation, coordinated by INTERPOL—the world’s largest international police organization—booked more than 60 alleged criminals in five African countries.

A victim of poaching

Among those caught were four Chinese nationals attempting to smuggle ivory curios out of Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport. The rapidly growing presence of China in Africa is seen as a major driver of the ivory trade, experts say. Between 1998 and 2006, Chinese authorities seized an average of 39 tons of ivory each year, according to the United Nations Elephant Trade Information System.

Hippo’s have not only been a target of Bushmeat but their teeth and bones are used for carvings and jewelry

But wildlife authorities who participated in the sting—code-named Project Baba for Gilbert Baba, a Ghanaian ranger killed in the line of duty—say small-time traffickers arrested in recent weeks will lead them to bigger players.

Pendants from Congo made out of Hippo Teeth

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Organization of The Day: Lewa Conservancy

Posted in Africa: Elephants, Africa: Lions, Africa: Primates, Africa: Rhinos, Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2010 by kendickjerkins

 

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

During the 1970s population of black rhinos had dropped from 20,000 to fewer than 300, putting these animals in danger of becoming extinct. Since then, thanks to the Lewa Conservancy, over 40,000 acres has been dedicated to over 70 different animals. Since the 1970s Lewa has been able to double the population of rhinos! Lewa also lends a helping hand to the surrounding communities.

Their annual safaricom marathon has helped raise over 2,000,000, they have been able to build over 10 schools, establish forestry programs, support hospitals, provide free treatment to those injured by wildlife, as well as put projects in place such as tracker dog units to help the conservancy. They have even started a womens micro-credit program. The surrounding communities are impoverished and this program gives these women a chance to become more independent. They are given the chance to train and become entrepreneurs, hoping to reduce poverty and facilitate gender equity. Lewa’s efforts not only help out the animals in need, but the people as well.

To Learn More, please visit their site

Rhino Murdered During World Cup: Poachers Disguised As Rangers Caught Red Handed

Posted in Africa: Rhinos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Rangers in Kruger National Park managed to shoot and wound one rhino poacher in an exchange of gunfire that occurred after a dead rhino was found early Monday morning. The rhino had been shot and its horns were still intact.

Although two poachers managed to escape, the other is hospitalized and will appear in the Saselamani Periodical Court following recovery. Park spokesperson William Mambasa said via The Independent that the group of three poachers were wearing ranger uniforms as a disguise. The shooting occurred between Punda Maria and Shingwedzi Camp.

Photos of poached Rhino found in Kruger (Separate Incident)

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Family of 10 slaughtered on the Zimbabwe Mozambique border…

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by kendickjerkins

Poachers shot and killed 10 elephants at one spot in Gonarezhou National Park in Chikombedzi along Zimbabwe’s border with Mozambique and South Africa last week. The elephant carcasses without tusks were found lying along Mutandanjiva River near the road to Ndali communal lands in the north-eastern part of Gonarezhou.

Family of elephants left for dead

Parks and Wildlife Management Authority immediately put a US$1,000 reward for anyone with information leading to the arrest of the poachers. “The carcasses were discovered on June 1 and several spent cartridges from an FN riffle were found on the scene. The tusks were removed in what appeared to be a well-organized professional job.”

Ranger holding bloody ivory

Parks spokesperson Ms Caroline Washaya-Moyo said the newly appointed Parks Director General, Mr Vitalis Chadenga visited Gonarezhou at the weekend to get first hand information and he was satisfied by the level of investigations taking place, with assistance from national security agents.

To read the full article, click here

Organization of The Day: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

Posted in Africa: Elephants, Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 9, 2010 by kendickjerkins

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

David Sheldrick is a legendary figure in wildlife conservation, he founded what today is the largest national park in Kenya, Tsavo. He was the first warden of the Eastern Sector which stretched over 5,000 square miles. His dedication to helping wildlife lasted until the end of his life. He was a remarkable man with many achievements, he was the first person to ever hand-rear orphaned elephants. He was a man of great integrity and therefore, a trust has been formed in his name to have his legacy live on.

The trust supports the Tsavo National Park and cares for orphaned animals that have lost their parents to devastating events such as poaching. The trust raises them, keeps them from harm and re-introduces them into the wild where they belong. The Sheldrick Wildlife’s support stretches far and wide, they have spoken out about the ivory ban, put in place anti-poaching and de-snaring operations, as well as mobile veterinary projects. Their help gives hope to the war on wildlife.

To learn how you can help or donate, click here

Acrobatic Pilot Saves Wild Animals in Kenya

Posted in Africa: Elephants with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2010 by kendickjerkins

An american acrobatic pilot renowned for her skills at air shows is teaching advanced flying skills to Kenyan pilots to help them spot wildlife poachers. Patty Wagstaff has won three acrobatic flying championships. She also trains pilots and has been lending her time and expertise to wild elephant conservation. Wildlife poachers have said the top deterrent to poaching wild animals is air patrols. Flying so low and at slower speeds to spot poachers is dangerous for pilots in Kenya who sometimes have only basic flying skills.

Wagstaff teaches them in week-long clinics, partly funded by the Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh Foundation. From her they learn techniques that reduce mistakes which too often lead to crashes. They love to fly and care about wildlife, so they are happy to take to the sky and spot poachers. Wild elephants have been poached in Kenya for their ivory going back a long time. She has been working with the pilots for six years to reduce and stop it. The pilots there are associated with the Kenya Wildlife Service.

To read the full article, click here

Organization of The Day: Save The Elephants

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2010 by kendickjerkins

SAVE THE ELEPHANTS

After witnessing the complete devastation of African elephants in the 70’s an 80’s, a period which saw the demise of half of Africa’s elephant population due to poaching, Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton alerted the world of an “ivory poaching holocaust”. His revolutionary research into the status and behavior of the African elephant gave him the insight needed to establish an organization that would fight for the future of these animals. Founded in 1993, Save the Elephants (STE) is a non-governmental organization focused on saving the vastly-impacted African elephant population and its environment, while also striving to bridge a dynamic relationship between humans and elephants. Their strategy is centered on four pillars critical to guarding the future of the elephants: research, protection, grassroots efforts, and education. STE’s innovative research on elephant behavior and ecology allows them to develop conservation efforts that are cognizant of the elephants’ point of view.

The organization teams with local wildlife departments to fight poaching by using aerial surveillance and radio tracking to protect these amazing animals. STE strengthens their efforts by working directly with the local people living amongst the elephants and encouraging them to participate and engage in the organization’s research and education initiatives.

The organization serves as a prime example of the power behind developing a conservation ethic that incorporates local knowledge and helps to create a two-way ambassadorship between the local people and the elephants. STE also uses education to increase global awareness about the state of the African elephant and the intricate and intelligent design of these animals. Most recently, Save the Elephants has been a major player in the opposition against banning the illegal ivory trade, believed to be the greatest potential threat to elephants, at the 15th Conference of the Parties (COP15) of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)

To Learn More about Save The Elephants Click Here…