Archive for Himalayas

Organization of the Day: Bear Research and Conservation Nepal

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 2, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 Asiatic Black Bears are considered ‘vulnerable’ by the IUCN, and are suffering a rapid decline largely due to habitat loss, illegal trade in bile and paws, and conflict with humans.  These bears are known to invade and consume farmers’ crops, especially that of corn, and can cause significant income loss in the process.  This has resulted in a negative view of these animals and a lack of conservation in its range.  Quality research and effective conservation efforts are needed to ensure their future.

Photo via bearsoftheworld.net

Biologists and researchers concerned with the plight of these predatory mammals, and other wildlife living in Nepal, have come together to form a small, grassroots organization known as Bear Research and Conservation Nepal (BRCN).  Continue reading

Organization of the Day: Bear Research and Conservation Nepal

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 16, 2010 by Rene Valdez

 Asiatic Black Bears are considered ‘vulnerable’ by the IUCN, and are suffering a rapid decline largely due to habitat loss, illegal trade in bile and paws, and conflict with humans.  These bears are known to invade and consume farmers’ crops, especially that of corn, and can cause significant income loss in the process.  This has resulted in a negative view of these animals and a lack of conservation in its range.  Quality research and effective conservation efforts are needed to ensure their future.

Photo via bearsoftheworld.net

Biologists and researchers concerned with the plight of these predatory mammals, and other wildlife living in Nepal, have come together to form a small, grassroots organization known as Bear Research and Conservation Nepal (BRCN).  Established in 2008, the focus of BRCN is to research the way the bears utilize their habitat and their interactions with humans, in order to determine and implement the most effective actions needed to best protect this species and its ecosystem.  Additionally, they are active in educating local communities about living with bears and try to inspire a conservationist attitude for both the bears and other wildlife.

The organization has diligently studied bears in and around protected national parks and reserves in Nepal.   They collaborate with local, national, and international organizations to conserve, restore, and enhance habitat.  BRCN understands the importance of a balanced ecosystem, and seeks to minimize negative impacts on it caused by humans.  Aside from bears, the organization has also conducted research on the endangered Hispid Hare and threatened songbirds, such as the Hodgson’s Bushcat.  This research will ultimately help them to identify and implement the most effective conservation strategies for protecting critical habitat.

Hispid Hare (photo credit: Joanna Van Gruisen)

Many communities see these bears as threats to both their lives and their livelihoods.  As a result of their fear and misunderstanding of these animals, the bears are often killed.  The research BRCN conducts evaluates the bears’ habitat use, in order to identify areas where a clash with humans is likely.  By identifying these areas, the organization can work with local communities to mitigate conflict with the animals.

Photo via cringel.com

Education and outreach are essential components to the conservation of wildlife, especially when human-wildlife conflict is part of the problem.  Bear Research and Conservation Nepal works with government agencies to create education programs that target communities within the range of the Asiatic Bear.  BRCN promotes a peaceful co-existence with these animals by teaching communities about the bear itself, and also what they can do to minimize conflict and crop raiding.

The organization has also been involved with a documentary about these predators.  “Max’s Big Tracks- Nepal’s Yeti” was broadcast globally on the Animal Planet, and explored the history and folklore of the black bear in Nepal.  BRCN hopes to continue developing documentaries and visual presentations in the future, in order bring needed attention to the status of this species.  The organization is also planning to open a wildlife orphanage, which would be the first of its kind in Nepal.  In collaboration with government and non-government agencies, this sort of orphanage would save lives and contribute to healthy wildlife populations.

For more information on Bear Research and Conservation Nepal, please visit their website.

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Happy Birthday Bush Warriors!

Posted in About, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 15, 2010 by Dori G

Note: Please play this MUST SEE video and enjoy.  This is what is at stake!

 

 

A year ago on November 13th, Bush Warriors was first launched into to the world.  This was my attempt to put the truth out there of what is really going on with our world’s wildlife.  Everyone loves nature and wildlife.  We all love lions, tigers, bears and dolphins.  We even love sharks, though we were taught to be afraid of them.  Wildlife and nature is gaining more popularity than ever, everywhere you look “a green lifestyle” is the new trend.  ‘Organic’ and ‘nature’ are buzz words surrounding corporate board rooms, the way we live,  and the food we eat.  It’s all about ‘going back to nature’.

The sad and unfortunate reality is that we are just about as far from nature as we can get.  In fact, we, as humans, are getting further from it by the minute.  Despite the growing popularity of the ‘green revolution’, species continue to be lost at unprecedented rates.  The fight to save species is not small or easy.  Many challenges block the path to success, including corruption, economics (both poverty and wealth), overconsumption of our natural resources, consumerist demand, and societal values.

Photo by Takeshi Igarashi

We live in a world where biodiversity is given due attention only when it is deemed profitable or there is some underlying financial interest in saving it.  Some even say, “What is the point in spending well needed funds on animals we know will be extinct from their natural habitat in a generation or two?”

If we truly open our eyes to see what has happened to the world around us, we will not be able to live with ourselves and the destruction of our planet that we cause on a daily basis.  Plastic bags that help us carry food from stores are killing our sea turtles, as they  are being mistaken for jellyfish.  Palm oil, as harmless as it sounds, is a real killer to many of our earth’s forests and all that inhabit them.  Yet it is widely used to give our foods a longer shelf life, so that we may enjoy our microwave popcorn.  The cost of palm oil is not just the cost of cheap, processed foods.  It is also costing us majestic creatures, like orangutans.  Valuable components of an ecosystem that also display many similar emotional and social behavior as us humans.  Now they slip into the brink of extinction and are being used, abused and slaughtered, while their natural habitat is replaced by palm oil plantations.

Rhinos and elephants, animal icons that we love so much, are systematically being murdered for their horns and tusks. In fact is its estimated that 102 elephants are being killed a day. That is almost a kilometer (over half a mile) of dead elephants on a daily basis.

Photo Credit: Michael Nicols

Since 1997, 353 new species have been discovered in the Himalayas, 1,220 in the Amazon and 1,231 in the Mekong region.  Our world has such a rich biodiversity,  and yet, with all of our knowledge and growing understanding of how fragile our ecosystems are, we are losing species before they are even discovered.

We citizens of the world must unite in a unified global voice saying, “Enough is enough.”  We must put a stop to the war taking place on our wildlife and natural world.  If we don’t, it will be lost for good and we will also lose ourselves in the process.

We need your help is educating and spreading the word. Please join our growing Bush Warriors global tribe in spreading the message.  We have created the Bush Warriors Ambassadors program that gives you tools for five second online advocacy.  All you need to do is paste our blurbs and links on your Facebook, Myspace, email, or any other social platform, and you are done. By doing this you have become an ambassador for change.

We have already grown so much in our first year, and plan to push harder and reach more people in our coming years.  Join us in our efforts and step up to be a voice for wildlife today!

Asante Sana

Dori & The Bush Warriors Clan