Archive for CITES

IUCN Species of the Day: Hirola

Posted in IUCN Species of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 12, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species(tm)
Hirola

Photo credit: Tim Wacher

 

The Hirola, Beatragus hunteri, is listed as ‘CRITICALLY ENDANGERED’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species TM. Continue reading

IUCN Species of the Day: Central American River Turtle

Posted in IUCN Species of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 7, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species(tm)

Photo credit: John Polisar

 

The Central American River Turtle, Dermatemys mawii, is listed as ‘CRITICALLY ENDANGERED’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. Continue reading

Feathered Extinction: Habitat Loss and Illegal Trade Threaten Doom for Africa’s Parrots, World Parrot Trust Africa to the Rescue!

Posted in Biodiversity, Birds with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 4, 2011 by drsteveboyes

Originally featured on 17 December, 2011.

Parrots have the largest number of threatened species of all bird families. Over 100 of the 332 known parrot species are threatened with extinction in the wild, and the declines of about 78 of these are being fueled by habitat loss and fragmentation. Roughly 39 are heavily pressured by capture and nest poaching for the wild-caught bird trade.

Photo credit: Chuck Bergman

Cavity-nesting forest specialists, like our African parrots, are particularly sensitive to forest degradation due to their reliance on large hardwood trees for sustenance and nesting opportunities. Deforestation rates in Africa are the second highest world, claiming over four million hectares of forest cover every year. Logging, wildfire, tree felling for use as fuel, the booming charcoal production industry, civil unrest, and conversion of land for agriculture and expansion of the human population are the primary forces driving the rampant destruction of critical African parrot habitat.

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IUCN Species of the Day: Pinta Island Tortoise

Posted in IUCN Species of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species(tm)

Photo credit: Patrick J. Endres

 

The Pinta Island Tortoise, Chelonoidis (nigra) abingdonii, is listed as ‘EXTINCT IN THE WILD’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. While there is some scientific disagreement as to whether the various Galapagos tortoises represent separate species or subspecies, all agree that Lonesome George is the last surviving individual of his kind.
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EIA Warns Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao of Tiger Vow ‘Mockery’

Posted in Asia: Tigers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2011 by Bush Warriors

PRESS RELEASE: CHINA PREMIER WARNED OF TIGER VOW ‘MOCKERY’

 EIA’s personal letter highlights gap between promises and actions


The Environmental Investigation Agency has written a personal letter to Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao to warn him that significant failings within a key state department in China are making a mockery of his pledge to “vigorously combat poaching, trade and smuggling of tiger products”.

Photo credit: WWF-Indonesia

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Bush Warriors Photography & iLCP: Celebrating the International Year of Forests with Amy Gulick

Posted in iLCP: Bringin Conservation Into Focus, Photo of the Day, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2011 by ilcpcommunications

Being a conservation photographer is more than just tripping the camera shutter. The real work begins after the pictures are made. What defines an iLCP photographer is a commitment to using powerful images for conservation. A shining example of this commitment is iLCP Fellow Amy Gulick. She takes the time to step out from behind the camera and put her images in front of those who can make a difference.

2011 is the International Year of Forests as designated by the U.N. General Assembly — perfect timing to showcase Amy’s work on the Tongass National Forest of Alaska and call attention to one of the most magnificent forests on Earth.

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Live from the Congo: Poachers, Smoked Monkey Head, and Trapped Parrots, But No Elephants in Sight

Posted in Live From the Congo: Elephant Ivory Project, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2011 by Dori G

There was a shootout.  Andy and I weren’t there, but we learned through satellite text messages that Colonel Gui and his soldiers from the Congolese army ran into the bandits somewhere between Kisangani and Obenge—likely the brothers of Colonel Toms, a convicted war criminal and poacher. A gunfight ensued. One poacher was injured and two others were apprehended. Colonel Gui, with his prisoners in tow, is still coming to Obenge to route out poachers in the region.  We should see them tomorrow.

I got the news during a four-day sampling hike through TL2 with Andy and the scientist John Hart [http://www.bonoboincongo.com]. But let me back up. After Kisangani, which is where I last blogged, we flew to Kindu, a town on the border of the 25,000 square mile jungle known as TL2. It’s the region Elephant Ivory Project-lead Samuel Wasser [http://depts.washington.edu/conserv/Director.html] wants elephant dung samples from most (read the previous posts to understand why). From Kindu, the three of us spent two days on the back of motorbikes, riding dirt paths notched into the jungle and savannah. These paths are arteries out of the bush. We saw locals pushing bicycles loaded with everything from pineapples to bush meat in the form of monkeys and okapi, a striped cousin of the giraffe. At the Lomami River, we loaded into motorized pirogues for a supposed two-day trip north to Obenge, the Hart’s research camp in the northern part of the proposed Lomami National Park. John stopped at every riverside village—about a dozen–to explain what the national park meant for the locals.

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