Archive for Animal Trafficking

Video of the Day: No More Shark Blood!

Posted in Video of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2011 by Bush Warriors

What is the Shark-Free Marina Initiative?

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Organization of the Day: Bear Research and Conservation Nepal

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 2, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 Asiatic Black Bears are considered ‘vulnerable’ by the IUCN, and are suffering a rapid decline largely due to habitat loss, illegal trade in bile and paws, and conflict with humans.  These bears are known to invade and consume farmers’ crops, especially that of corn, and can cause significant income loss in the process.  This has resulted in a negative view of these animals and a lack of conservation in its range.  Quality research and effective conservation efforts are needed to ensure their future.

Photo via bearsoftheworld.net

Biologists and researchers concerned with the plight of these predatory mammals, and other wildlife living in Nepal, have come together to form a small, grassroots organization known as Bear Research and Conservation Nepal (BRCN).  Continue reading

Tattoo of the Day

Posted in Tattoo of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2011 by Bush Warriors

Tattoo by Tony Sklepic.

While most know that zebras’ stripes serve as camouflage for protection from predators (when grouped together, their stripes make it hard for a predator to see just a single individual), there remains the conundrum of: Is it a black coat with white stripes, or a white coat with black stripes?   Continue reading

Meet Alison Jones, iLCP Photographer of the Month

Posted in iLCP: Bringin Conservation Into Focus with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 31, 2011 by ilcpcommunications

Alison Jones is the International League of Conservation Photographers’s (iLCP) ‘Photographer of the Month’!

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EIA Warns Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao of Tiger Vow ‘Mockery’

Posted in Asia: Tigers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2011 by Bush Warriors

PRESS RELEASE: CHINA PREMIER WARNED OF TIGER VOW ‘MOCKERY’

 EIA’s personal letter highlights gap between promises and actions


The Environmental Investigation Agency has written a personal letter to Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao to warn him that significant failings within a key state department in China are making a mockery of his pledge to “vigorously combat poaching, trade and smuggling of tiger products”.

Photo credit: WWF-Indonesia

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Bush Warriors Photography & iLCP: Celebrating the International Year of Forests with Amy Gulick

Posted in iLCP: Bringin Conservation Into Focus, Photo of the Day, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2011 by ilcpcommunications

Being a conservation photographer is more than just tripping the camera shutter. The real work begins after the pictures are made. What defines an iLCP photographer is a commitment to using powerful images for conservation. A shining example of this commitment is iLCP Fellow Amy Gulick. She takes the time to step out from behind the camera and put her images in front of those who can make a difference.

2011 is the International Year of Forests as designated by the U.N. General Assembly — perfect timing to showcase Amy’s work on the Tongass National Forest of Alaska and call attention to one of the most magnificent forests on Earth.

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Live from the Congo: Poachers, Smoked Monkey Head, and Trapped Parrots, But No Elephants in Sight

Posted in Live From the Congo: Elephant Ivory Project, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2011 by Dori G

There was a shootout.  Andy and I weren’t there, but we learned through satellite text messages that Colonel Gui and his soldiers from the Congolese army ran into the bandits somewhere between Kisangani and Obenge—likely the brothers of Colonel Toms, a convicted war criminal and poacher. A gunfight ensued. One poacher was injured and two others were apprehended. Colonel Gui, with his prisoners in tow, is still coming to Obenge to route out poachers in the region.  We should see them tomorrow.

I got the news during a four-day sampling hike through TL2 with Andy and the scientist John Hart [http://www.bonoboincongo.com]. But let me back up. After Kisangani, which is where I last blogged, we flew to Kindu, a town on the border of the 25,000 square mile jungle known as TL2. It’s the region Elephant Ivory Project-lead Samuel Wasser [http://depts.washington.edu/conserv/Director.html] wants elephant dung samples from most (read the previous posts to understand why). From Kindu, the three of us spent two days on the back of motorbikes, riding dirt paths notched into the jungle and savannah. These paths are arteries out of the bush. We saw locals pushing bicycles loaded with everything from pineapples to bush meat in the form of monkeys and okapi, a striped cousin of the giraffe. At the Lomami River, we loaded into motorized pirogues for a supposed two-day trip north to Obenge, the Hart’s research camp in the northern part of the proposed Lomami National Park. John stopped at every riverside village—about a dozen–to explain what the national park meant for the locals.

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