Archive for the Organization of The Day Category

Organization of the Day: Limbe Wildlife Centre

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 2, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 

Illegal trade in bushmeat and pets is an intense and growing problem threatening wildlife. Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC) is a wildlife rescue and rehabilitation project dedicated to the conservation and rehabilitation of wild animals. Founded in 1993 by the Pandrillus Foundation, other NGOs, and the government of Cameroon, Limbe Wildlife Centre has become a successful sanctuary for a variety of wildlife; including monkeys, chimpanzees, gorillas, reptiles and bird species. Cameroon is also home to a largely diverse amount of plant species and LWC is concerned with the conservation of plant life as well. The Centre plays an active role in the implementation and enforcement of national wildlife protection laws, providing a place for seized animals to recuperate and received medical attention if needed.

Photo credit: Markus Betz

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Organization of the Day: Bonobo Conservation Initiative

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 14, 2011 by Bush Warriors

Due to the hostile nature of Congo’s war-ravaged lands, the number of remaining Bonobos apes is one that is hard to pinpoint, and as a result there is no true approximation of their population size today. We are aware of one major fact, however.  These creatures are endangered and their numbers are only decreasing. Multiple threats face the bonobos. Their main habitat exists within only one country: the Democratic Republic of Congo. The wars that have faced this area have directly affected the bonobos, through bushmeat trade and the destruction of their natural habitat.

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Organization of the Day: Bear Research and Conservation Nepal

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 2, 2011 by Bush Warriors

 Asiatic Black Bears are considered ‘vulnerable’ by the IUCN, and are suffering a rapid decline largely due to habitat loss, illegal trade in bile and paws, and conflict with humans.  These bears are known to invade and consume farmers’ crops, especially that of corn, and can cause significant income loss in the process.  This has resulted in a negative view of these animals and a lack of conservation in its range.  Quality research and effective conservation efforts are needed to ensure their future.

Photo via bearsoftheworld.net

Biologists and researchers concerned with the plight of these predatory mammals, and other wildlife living in Nepal, have come together to form a small, grassroots organization known as Bear Research and Conservation Nepal (BRCN).  Continue reading

Organization of the Day: J.A.C.K.

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2011 by Dori G

In 1960 the estimated population of chimpanzees was estimated at around one million individuals. Today the estimates have been dramatically reduced to 172,000 to 300,000 remaining, a decline of on the scale of 70-83%. Roughly 40% of this population is living within the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), an area where conservation efforts are greatly limited because its dangerous, war-torn conditions. The fact that a large portion of the chimp population inhabits the DRC makes this area essential for targeting conservation efforts in order to save this species. Chimpanzees there are being poached and removed live from their habitat to be sold in the black market for bushmeat and other illegal purposes like pet trade. Infant chimps are highly valuable in the pet trade as they are more manageable at that age. As they reach sexual maturity, their behavior becomes unmanageable and dangerous, as hormones fuel their now aggressive behaviors.

Chimpanzees are a highly social creature, relying on their tight social group to survive and aggressively protect their young. Thus capturing an infant is dangerous and difficult, and it is estimated that ten adult chimps have been killed for every one infant that has been captured or orphaned due to poaching activities. Immediate action is needed to prevent the extinction of this species. Founded in 2006 by Franck and Roxanne Chantereau, the self-funded Jeunes Animaux Confisqués au Katanga (J.A.C.K.) has taken a brave stand and created a protected refuge in Lubumbashi for chimps confiscated by DRC authorities. The Chantereaus have been doing their best to monitor the chimpanzees in the Lubumbashi area, and,have seen a loss in excess of 4,000 chimpanzees in Lubumbashi in the last 10 years alone. J.A.C.K also works with Congolese National Parks in hopes to eventually facilitate the return of their orphans into the wild. Wildlife conservation is not at the forefront of the minds of the povery-stricken, starved, and malnourished human population of the DRC. Their main concerns are focused on finding food by any means possible, which often includes bushmeat. In fact, their desperation might even be seen in their language, as the Swahili word for wildlife, “nyama”, also means “meat”.

Photo credit: Miriam Mannak

As a result of these conditions, J.A.C.K tries to raise awareness through educating the local people, believing conservation needs can be met through education. They have been extremely successful in their efforts with an estimated 12,000 local visitors to their facility each month, most being school children. J.A.C.K hopes their conservation efforts and messages will be carried into the future by the younger generations. The organization continues to expand, hoping to be able to develop even more educational activities within their refuge where children can view conservation videos and have a more interactive experience. Taking a stand in a place where most are too afraid to act, J.A.C.K’s efforts are nothing short of commendable. Without their sanctuary, it is certain that a far greater loss of the DRC’s invaluable chimp population would have occurred.

Photo credit: Miriam Mannak

 

To learn more, please visit their website.

 

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Organization of the Day: Living With Lions

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 6, 2011 by Dori G

Living With Lions

Until recently scientists believed there were 100-200,000 lions living in Africa, but a recent survey has found that the number has dropped dramatically to approximately 23,000 and most of these are living in protected National Parks. Howeve, outside these areas and even some from within, lions are being killed at an alarming rate.  Unless urgent action is taken, they may be completely wiped out.

Living with Lions is a research and conservation group that works to save the remaining wild lions and other predators outside protected areas in Kenya. The organization currently has five projects: Lion Guardians, Mara Predator Project, Laikipia Predator Project, Amboseli Predator Project and the Kilimanjaro Lion Conservation Project. The Lion Guardians program was created in response to the slaughtering of over 200 lions in the Amboseli-Tsavo Ecosystem since 2001.  The group monitors lions, educates communities, and provides tools to mitigate human-wildlife conflict. The Laikipia and Amboseli Predator projects study the threats posed to lions outside protected areas and uses this information to develop practical measures that encourage coexistence between people, livestock and predators.

The Mara Predator Project (MPP) is monitoring the lions in this area, identifying key trends and shifts in population, and building an online database of individual lions so that effective conservation methods can be applied. Lastly, the Kilimanjaro Lion Conservation Project (KLCP) was established in early 2004 to try to use some of the lessons learned in Laikipia to halt the massacre of these big cats in an area of Maasailand between the Chyulu Hills, Tsavo and Amboseli National Parks in southern Kenya.

Living With Lions is lead by Dr. Lawrence G. Frank and his outstanding team of project biologists and coordinators. To learn more, click here.

Organization of the Day: Bear Research and Conservation Nepal

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 16, 2010 by Rene Valdez

 Asiatic Black Bears are considered ‘vulnerable’ by the IUCN, and are suffering a rapid decline largely due to habitat loss, illegal trade in bile and paws, and conflict with humans.  These bears are known to invade and consume farmers’ crops, especially that of corn, and can cause significant income loss in the process.  This has resulted in a negative view of these animals and a lack of conservation in its range.  Quality research and effective conservation efforts are needed to ensure their future.

Photo via bearsoftheworld.net

Biologists and researchers concerned with the plight of these predatory mammals, and other wildlife living in Nepal, have come together to form a small, grassroots organization known as Bear Research and Conservation Nepal (BRCN).  Established in 2008, the focus of BRCN is to research the way the bears utilize their habitat and their interactions with humans, in order to determine and implement the most effective actions needed to best protect this species and its ecosystem.  Additionally, they are active in educating local communities about living with bears and try to inspire a conservationist attitude for both the bears and other wildlife.

The organization has diligently studied bears in and around protected national parks and reserves in Nepal.   They collaborate with local, national, and international organizations to conserve, restore, and enhance habitat.  BRCN understands the importance of a balanced ecosystem, and seeks to minimize negative impacts on it caused by humans.  Aside from bears, the organization has also conducted research on the endangered Hispid Hare and threatened songbirds, such as the Hodgson’s Bushcat.  This research will ultimately help them to identify and implement the most effective conservation strategies for protecting critical habitat.

Hispid Hare (photo credit: Joanna Van Gruisen)

Many communities see these bears as threats to both their lives and their livelihoods.  As a result of their fear and misunderstanding of these animals, the bears are often killed.  The research BRCN conducts evaluates the bears’ habitat use, in order to identify areas where a clash with humans is likely.  By identifying these areas, the organization can work with local communities to mitigate conflict with the animals.

Photo via cringel.com

Education and outreach are essential components to the conservation of wildlife, especially when human-wildlife conflict is part of the problem.  Bear Research and Conservation Nepal works with government agencies to create education programs that target communities within the range of the Asiatic Bear.  BRCN promotes a peaceful co-existence with these animals by teaching communities about the bear itself, and also what they can do to minimize conflict and crop raiding.

The organization has also been involved with a documentary about these predators.  “Max’s Big Tracks- Nepal’s Yeti” was broadcast globally on the Animal Planet, and explored the history and folklore of the black bear in Nepal.  BRCN hopes to continue developing documentaries and visual presentations in the future, in order bring needed attention to the status of this species.  The organization is also planning to open a wildlife orphanage, which would be the first of its kind in Nepal.  In collaboration with government and non-government agencies, this sort of orphanage would save lives and contribute to healthy wildlife populations.

For more information on Bear Research and Conservation Nepal, please visit their website.

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Organization of the Day: Limbe Wildlife Centre

Posted in Organization of The Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2010 by Dori G

Illegal trade in bushmeat and pets is an intense and growing problem threatening wildlife. Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC) is a wildlife rescue and rehabilitation project dedicated to the conservation and rehabilitation of wild animals. Founded in 1993 by the Pandrillus Foundation, other NGOs, and the government of Cameroon, Limbe Wildlife Centre has become a successful sanctuary for a variety of wildlife; including monkeys, chimpanzees, gorillas, reptiles and bird species. Cameroon is also home to a largely diverse amount of plant species and LWC is concerned with the conservation of plant life as well. The Centre plays an active role in the implementation and enforcement of national wildlife protection laws, providing a place for seized animals to recuperate and received medical attention if needed.

Photo credit: Markus Betz

Rescuing animals is at the core of their purposes and all of the animals they take in are victims of illegal bushmeat activities, have been orphaned, or were kept as pets. As a result, these animals arrive in very poor condition and LWC rehabilitates these unfortunate animals through their Veterinary Care program. After they are quarantined for health risks, the animals are introduced to a group of their own species in order to make a transition into the more natural, wild way of life. LWC also believes that the success of conservation of plant and animals depends highly on education.

Their Centre has an amazingly large number of native visitors, which is uncommon in that area of the world. When they come to the facility, they are able to observe these wild animals and gain respect for them. They also facilitate nature clubs, a school outreach program, and conservation workshops to encourage the youth of the country to get involved in and support conservation. It is through education that they hope that their conservation efforts will be carried on through the future. Limbe Wildlife Centre gives hope to animals that may not otherwise stand a chance at survival and contributing to the proliferation of their species. Their rehabilitation work is extraordinary and extremely important to conservation efforts for Cameroon’s wildlife.

To learn more, please visit their website.